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Nala Rogers

Science Writer

Washington DC

Nala Rogers

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How To Win Friends And Influence Ducklings

How should you treat your ducks? The answer is mired in duckling politics. When ducklings head out to bathe in a pool, they usually follow the same individual, new research has found. But do they visit the pool that’s best for everyone, or just the one their chief prefers? This puzzle has made it hard for farmers to know how to provide for all their ducks equally, and for biologists to know what social animals really want.
InsideScience (reposted by Scientific American) Link to Story
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Incognito Caterpillar Threatens U.S. Borders

One of the worst insect pests in the world is coming to the U.S., and it’s coming in disguise. By almost any measure of pest severity, the Old World bollworm Helicoverpa armigera tops the charts. Annual losses from the pest are estimated at $5 billion. The caterpillars eat more than 180 kinds of plants including cotton, corn, soybeans, citrus fruits and ornamental flowers.
Scientific American Link to Story
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Sexual Cannibal Spiders May Have Poor Impulse Control

Spider courtship is a risky business. In some species females routinely decide that they would rather eat a courting male than mate with him, and researchers have struggled for decades to understand why. A recent experiment with Iberian tarantulas suggests that the reason may depend on an individual spider’s personality.
Scientific American Link to Story
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Seductive Yeast Cells are Just the Right Size

Picking the right mate is a formidable challenge for most humans, but baker’s yeast manages it without a brain or the ability to move around. A recent study found that when food is abundant, yeast spores mate with big partners that can take advantage of the feast, while in lean times, they prefer to mate with small spores that need less food.
Scientific American Link to Story

About

Nala Rogers

I am a staff writer at Inside Science, where I cover the Earth and Creature beats. I have written for Science, Nature, Scientific American, the University of Utah, and other outlets. In my free time I like to play with wildlife.

Phone: 801-949-2128
Email: nalarogers42@gmail.com